Diet for a Small Planet (20th Anniversary Edition)

The Paleo Recipe Book

Diet for a Small Planet (20th Anniversary Edition)

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Here again is the extraordinary bestselling book that taught America the social and personal significance of a new way of eating– one that remains a complete guide for eating well in the 90s. Featuring: simple rules for a healthy diet; a streamlined, easy-to-use format; delicious food combinations of protein-rich meals without meat; hundreds of wonderful recipes, and much more.


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Diet for a Small Planet (20th Anniversary Edition)

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Total overall health and wellness; we’ve complied all three books for your enjoyment.


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The Tummy Buster plus 3: Three books in one! Total overall health and wellness!

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3 thoughts on “Diet for a Small Planet (20th Anniversary Edition)

  1. 89 of 92 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Small planet, big influence, February 27, 2002
    By 
    Joanna Daneman (USA) –
    (VINE VOICE)
      
    (COMMUNITY FORUM 04)
      
    (#1 Hall OF FAME REVIEWER)
      
    (TOP 10 REVIEWER)
      

    This review is from: Diet for a Small Planet (20th Anniversary Edition) (Mass Market Paperback)
    This is an amazing book. It has lasted longer on the shelves than many other books of its kind and packs an influential punch.
    The secret of “Diet for a Small Planet” is that it contains something for everyone, whether you believe in vegetarianism, the ecological production of the food supply or just want better health.
    If you are an animal activist or don’t eat meat for religious reasons, Lappe provides valuable info on how to get the proper balance in your diet by matching foods to get all the essential amino acids you need (the building blocks of proteins.)
    If you are interested in health, you can use Lappe’s book to provide alternative main dishes that are satisfying and lower in fat, higher in fiber. Meat is a major source of saturated fats, beans and rice and other grains provide lots of benefits such as soluable and insoluable fiber, vitamins and minerals.
    If you are ecologically minded, and this is the thrust of the book, you can eat comfortably, knowing your dietary items take up less resources to grow.
    I don’t subscribe to all Lappe’s philosophies, yet, this book had and continues to have a major influence on me. Rice and beans or grains and beans are regular items on our table, meatless days outnumber days when meat is on the table, and this is because I read Lappe’s book long ago. I am sure I am better for knowing the information here.

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  2. 34 of 35 people found the following review helpful
    3.0 out of 5 stars
    even with ‘protein complementarity’ refuted, a source for simple, affordable ethnic recipes based on legumes & grains, November 17, 2010
    By 
    Jeffrey L. Blackwell (Ft Myers, Florida) –
    (REAL NAME)
      

    Like so many applied chemistry students in the 1970s, Diet for a Small Planet was among the books that made chemistry ‘alive’. It brought our classroom abstractions to the kitchen table. Lappe’s writing is persuasive and readable and her recipes are simple and affordable enough for a student’s skill & budget.

    Much of the controversy of this book arose regarding its 2 main points.
    1) When proteins are assimilated or metabolized as a ‘complete protein’ containing all amino acids in proper proportions, there is a high ‘protein utilization’ by enzymes / human digestive system. (see note, this was researched and refuted in 1981)
    2) The ‘food chain’ pyramid of feed grains to animal meat has about a 10% net protein efficiency. That is, you get 10 times more protein eating corn & beans vs. eating beef or red meat protein.

    Lappe’s contention that we could feed many of the world’s malnourished if we in rich nations were vegetarians or used meats as seasoning rather than entrees may be a scientific & nutritional ideal. The bad news is that it is as difficult to change traditional patterns of food consumption as it is to change religion or culture. The good news is ‘protein complementarity or not’, combos of legumes and grains have for centuries been the traditional pattern of food comsumption by the poor in most of Latin America & Asia. whether eaten as a meal or not, the ‘survival value’ of these protein-rich combos made them the ‘fittest’ for the environment so they became traditions.

    For similar food chem books, try Harold McGee or especially Shirley Corriher’s classic ‘Cookwise’.

    Note from Wikipedia:
    ‘In fact, the original source of the theory, Frances Moore Lappé, changed her position on protein combining. In the 1981 edition of Diet for a Small Planet, she wrote:

    “In 1971 I stressed protein complementarity because I assumed that the only way to get enough protein … was to create a protein as usable by the body as animal protein. In combating the myth that meat is the only way to get high-quality protein, I reinforced another myth. I gave the impression that in order to get enough protein without meat, considerable care was needed in choosing foods. Actually, it is much easier than I thought.
    “With three important exceptions, there is little danger of protein deficiency in a plant food diet. The exceptions are diets very heavily dependent on
    [1] fruit
    [2] some tubers, such as sweet potatoes or cassava,
    [3] junk food (refined flours, sugars, and fat).
    Fortunately, relatively few people in the world try to survive on diets in which these foods are virtually the sole source of calories.

    In all other diets, if people are getting enough calories, they are virtually certain of getting enough protein.”[8]

    On the other hand, the principle of protein combining seems to have been unknowingly recognized by most traditional agricultural societies in the form of dishes that combine legumes with grains. Examples include the traditional Indian combination of dal and rice, the Middle Eastern pairing of pita bread with hummus, ful medames, or falafel, the West African combination of rice and beans (since spread in a circum-Caribbean distribution to the Caribbean islands, Brazil and elsewhere in Latin America, and to the Southern United States where it is known as Hoppin’ John), and the Mexican tradition of combining beans with tortillas and other dishes made of maize.’

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  3. 35 of 38 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Wonder where I’ve been that I missed this book till now!!??, July 5, 1999
    By 
    B. Smawley (USA) –
    (VINE VOICE)
      

    Verified Purchase(What’s this?)
    This review is from: Diet for a Small Planet (20th Anniversary Edition) (Mass Market Paperback)
    Oh gosh what can one say about a book that is so insightful and factually sound? I commend Ms. Lappe for pulling together all the data contained in this book. She does not preach nor try to change anyone’s mind. The info contained in the book reminded me of that old line “just the facts please.” I believe she focused on protein because it is “lack of protein if we don’t eat meat” (not vitamins, minerals, iron, etc.) that scare people about giving up meat. Ms. Lappe includes charts and facts and figures — all kinds of information — to reassure the reader that plant eaters can in fact get adequate protein from veggies — minus the artery-clogging fat. Certainly, one gets plenty of vitamins and other nutients from plant/grain foods. Perhaps we bring our personal baggage along when reading such a book. I believe it is wasteful to feed grain to animals when people worldwide are starving and I doubt the earth can continue to support such wastefulness. So I welcome books such as this. Each person should think over the issues then decide. If one decides to stop eating meat or to cut back on the amount eaten, this book is loaded with information to help with food combining in the plant/grain families to make sure one will get the necessary nutrients. The recipes are included to help us along, and I will be referring to them and this book often in the coming weeks (or months!) Ms. Lappe’s philosophy gets 5 stars too. I highly recommend this book.

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